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  • Ask not ...

    As I drove into work today, a thought occurred to me.

    I've assisted and emailed several times about what would be helpful to me in telling Ra's story. But what does the staff and Kurzon need from me? It's a bit of "ask not what your country can do for you". Cause over these last few months to a year, Ra' has thrown around several directions. Some paths wouldn't work for him. Some he can go down and will generate a great deal of conflict. And others are more laid back. With any real life concerns, I always want to be sure not to over commit to something that I can't follow through. Often that can be difficult to manage. I could easily list things I would like to see and be more than willing to help bring to realization. These range from a new tent for Ali to Alchemy. A few don't even start with the letter A.

    I know that I'm content with moving forward where I am. But to the staff: what are some things that you would like to see us players helping to do. We may not have staff powers, but there are plenty of toys we can play with that will push along various stories. So ...
    is there an inactive guild/group/hobby that needs more leadership?
    a political/social issue some of us can gather around?

    Maybe this won't go anywhere but it was a thought I figured to share.

    idly mused by Ra's player

  • #2
    I'm not staff but I have ideas! Something that I would absolutely LOVE to see in game is a candle-making guild in the Outer. Light sources are so exciting and open up so many possibilities to a new character/player and although we have some very cheap candles with the gnomes now I still think it's such a great crafting opportunity. However, it's never been fitting with Brook's aspirations or inclinations so I've never pursued it IC.

    We have bees, for wax, we have an OOC system of shapes and designs, we have a precedence in other guilds to allocate simple designs as being for commoners (like tapers), and epic five-wick pillar candles or scented/sculpted creations for the fancier peeps ... I think it could be really neat! If anyone else wanted to run with the idea IC Brook would absolutely champion it as a Patron (or customer ...) but again it's not exactly her thing.

    I'd also really like to see more done with tapestries.

    And if/when the forest is re-opened I *definitely* want to organise a hunt, though it's tricky IC because that's Bertram's jam and He's not around to join in
    Last edited by Brook; 07-16-2019, 07:51 AM. Reason: edited because i meant tapers not tallows

    ~ Keeper of the Royal Vault
    ~ Handmaiden of Her Majesty, Queen Vivienne

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    • #3
      From my own personal standpoint, I'd have to say that stories can be told with little to no staff intervention. Nobody should ever feel they've hit an obstacle where their character can no longer progress. Most of this game is what you make of it. If you have the chops, pick up the reins and move forward, do things, start groups, murder, solve murders -- whatever and eventually, when staff gets around to it (or when it becomes NECESSARY for staff to intervene), boom, you've got a full-blown story arc.

      Squire to Dame Eeva
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      StoryBuilder Chimi says, "O_O I just found something weird in your body. Hang on a sec...."

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      • #4
        There is plenty of RP around involving groups/guilds that need leadership, more active members, etc. Most of the answers to your questions can easily be learned IG and really don't have much to do with staff imo. Candle-making (I looked into it when I was newer) is done through the Chambers and not something viable enough to build a whole guild around (or that's what I was told). We have bees in limited amounts but they aren't a bountiful resource on the surface, so the crafting of candles is generally reserved for special IB events and for the Noble/Royal sealing stuff.

        In general I agree with Edstave. If people try to do things IG they can learn where the walls are and where staff intervention may actually be needed. Most of the time it isn't necessary unless new items are having to be generated and they require approval or building, OR if the story has the potential of bleeding into previous plots that were run by staff it's a good idea to give them a heads up I would imagine.
        Acolyte Natura of the Faith
        Courtier
        Head of Household for her Ladyship Sinvy
        Leader of the Stylists
        Mistress of Entertainments
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        • #5
          I wrote a big post, re-read it, and realized it sounded more aggressive and attacking than I intended it to, just on the nature of what it is.

          Basically, it boils down to a question for you all that are reading this.

          What holds you back from making up your own stories? Polite answers please, when we put so much time and energy into something, and then have it stripped away on someone elses whim, it can absolutely be frustrating. No matter how imaginary the hobby, it holds value based on the time invested in it. As the warcraft Goblin's say, Time is money friend.

          So, what's the biggest obstacle to you inventing your own stories here in this castle? I'm really curious.


          Edit -> Oh yeah, and I don't mean the re-run episodes of who is courting who relationship junk. Any highschool drama-teen can invent those scenes, I see it in the hallways all the time. Real juicy plots! That mean something to your character's growth as a person.

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          • #6
            Everyone has their own story to tell. Trust me, I have come up with more than a few, myself, but have never released them to anyone. I like to write books for fun, so I am not at a loss for creativity. However, trying to figure out how to tie my story into the story that is being told widely is difficult.

            Trust me on this one. Taite tried creating a position that does not -quite- fit into the story that is being told, now, but it does not mean that it will never happen. It will take time and a LOT of work to even make the idea reconsidered. Even though there are no plans in progress, it does not mean it is something that Taite no longer wants. I can envision her still drooling over the thought of being the Royal Sculptor.

            So, how can your character's story tie in with the current story? What are Ra's strengths? How do you get others to see you the way you want them to see you, and what do you have to do to make it happen?

            From what I gather, you want Ra to fit in and to be a part of something, which I think is an awesome idea. I like visiting with Radorcha because he is kind of laid back, and I see a lot of potential in him. Ra will always have the ability of a sorcerer, but since he is no longer in the guild, perhaps, it's time to try different avenues.

            Check these pages for the current openings in guilds.
            http://wiki.marrach.skotos.net/bin/v...c/GuildRosters

            Also, keep an eye on the boards. They are your one-stop-shop for opportunities.

            Good luck, and may the force be with you.

            Taite's P.


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            • #7
              My problem in coming up with stories is that nobody likes to lose and nobody wants to be the character to make a 'popular' character lose either. I also have issues with people thinking stories have to revolve around them getting promotions or new things that don't already exist in game. Most of the ideas we come up with are going to be a version of an idea someone else already has had over the years and when you're plotting and trying to get/give advice people don't want to take into consideration what has worked before and what hasn't, either for OOC or IC reasons. Some of the playerbase also has a problem about using OOC information IC and a lot of plotting gets done on an OOC level when big stories occur. That means you have to trust the people involved to roleplay true to their character and not to their OOC desires or information, which can be difficult and has been the downfall of plots before. It's super hard to entrust something you've spent years building to people you don't really know, and I think that's a big part of why player-driven plots don't occur more.
              Acolyte Natura of the Faith
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              Patron of the Duelists
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              • #8
                @Josie I am very guilty of that. Sorry for being a pain in your back-side.

                Even @ work, I'm very innovative. I'm pretty sure I drive my manager crazy with all of my ideas.

                It's easy to play a character that has the same attitude as myself, and thankfully, I only play only one character, because sometimes, she drives me crazy. Sometimes, I go a little overboard on the ideas, and it stresses me out. I've been playing her for nearly 2 years, and I still have to try to find that line between enough and too much when it comes to thinking and ideas.

                I have quit many games before, and it's always when I stop coming up with ideas. This happens at work, too, so it's not, exactly, game specific.

                Having Jo help her ICLY with her ideas as well as me OOCLY with the ideas, it helps me to figure out what can be done, and to focus more on ideas that can be completed IG without assistance. Taite's itching to sculpt and to have more things to work with. Whenever she's given a piece of wood or anything that isn't snow, she's happier than a kid in a candy store.

                So, thank you for helping, Jo's P!! I have no idea where Taite would be if it wasn't for your awesomeness.

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                Currently studying sculpting as a:
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                • #9
                  I do not know if adding another guild will help, though honestly I think candle making as a craft may be able to be added to an existing one. Guilds are just, because of the nature of CM, difficult to maintain and manage. People have lives, and things happen so people come and go and having stability to maintain the Guild and all the work that such entails is inherently complicated. In my experience, some of the best times of my life have not been plots but just character interaction. Or little things that spring activity and life into the Castle. It doesn't have to be an event, or a plot but it can be. There are just so many little things that characters can do that nudge a story and characters in one direction or another. While I very much enjoy participating in plots and such, my favorite times have often been RPing with people in Healing. My character has risen high and fallen far and has a very dynamic and interesting past. I am not thinking utterly clearly and may not be articulating my points well, but I am all far people pushing new ideas and new past-times and candle making could indeed be fun, but that will involve staff creating the code and taking the time to make that happen. They may say, hey great! Let's do it! But where it lies on the list of priorities of other projects? I can't speak for them so I guess my point is... participate in the guilds and activities and plots and stories of those around you. What pisses me off more than -anything- is when people who -want- to participate and involve and then are pushed aside or out of being able to RP in a story, so I try to avoid doing that with others and instead try to make up things people can do to so they can be involved if they want. But too I see people tag along in things and then... stand there and do nothing so if you are given the opportunity to participate in something, even if it's just a discussion, do something other than like... blink, or consider thoughtfully every now and then. Involve involve involve!

                  Anyway, just some food for thought I guess. There are some great people here, some very creative and intelligent people here. I think that we can do alot for CM if we pull together.

                  Stacy

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                  • #10
                    Kinda gone off OP thread but oh well. Will come back to it I'm sure.

                    I think on the suggestions of 'join a guild, join a House' etc do not really meet the root of Ra's player's question here which is seeking something that appeals more to a meta-game side of actual story telling and roleplay. Rather than idling in a room for an hour a week, or playing a winter themed bureaucracy simulator.

                    So, what's the biggest obstacle to you inventing your own stories here in this castle? I'm really curious.
                    This'll tie into Josie's player's post, but for one plot it was waiting to have a single prop to be signed off on, that was later rejected - so that kinda killed a plot that was planned between Anton and a few others. It could have gone in a different direction, but that did not suit character actions and so it fizzled out, unfortunately. On top of that needs a player base actively sized that suits the plot, along with free time for myself and others who might be dragged into it.

                    I think it comes down to a few things: Is this achievable? Will I be rewarded on an OOC level (do people want to see this, want to take part in this, will I achieve goals for my character, will I have fun, will others have fun)? Do I feel suitably comfortable, is there some sort of support for me (OOC friends, family or staff)? Trust as well, do I trust those RPing with or discussing the plot with to tell the story collaboratively? I think as well the risk/reward factor is very greatly weighted on the risk side, with possibly very little reward. Since it can take several weeks to get a character established, months for higher status, longer again (years even) for courtly rank - why risk anything that would take that away for possibly very little IC reward. OOC reward could come in the form of the story but see earlier point.

                    An example, I might want to make an alt that progresses within the Chambers. Well first got to do the boring admin work of doing the Awakeners stuff, tap the book a few times. Have the character know nothing, nod along as get told about being undead. Finish that, send a scroll, get a room. Sort of clothes, sort of anything else I wanted for them and then meet characters that I've RPed for years as if they are brand new. For me this is a snore, but it is a product of the game. Others might enjoy it but, after experiencing backstory in other games, I cannot say I do. I want to jump into the action and not spend a few weeks+ learning that the Queen likes tea, Bertram is sleepy and Boreas smashes wine glasses.

                    So that's an obstacle.

                    I think, on a totally personal level, a few months ago I read something on MU Soapbox that totally resonated with what my personal biggest obstacle is, I'll come back to that as it's a longer bit and diverts away from this question.

                    Originally posted by Josie
                    My problem in coming up with stories is that nobody likes to lose and nobody wants to be the character to make a 'popular' character lose either.
                    Yo, should have hmu fam. Would have been totally up for this.

                    Some of the playerbase also has a problem about using OOC information IC and a lot of plotting gets done on an OOC level when big stories occur. That means you have to trust the people involved to roleplay true to their character and not to their OOC desires or information, which can be difficult and has been the downfall of plots before. It's super hard to entrust something you've spent years building to people you don't really know, and I think that's a big part of why player-driven plots don't occur more.
                    I think you are right on one part here, but perhaps that is the culture of Marrach through years of indoctrination that discussing anything OOC seems to be bad. Some of my dearest friends I have met via this game, then in person later thanks to thinking - fuck it, why not? Why are we pushed to thinking that asking how someone is doing OOC is bad and could influence IC things.

                    Personally I rather plan my plots, or the key points to meet, through an OOC conversation so that I and others can understand the direction of the story and then tell it to the world. Have the world react and possibly meander it in different points. But, I think, people tend to jump to OOC conclusions about things that happen IC. An example that I saw would be, during the Anton and Juliee 'disagreements' they would quite openly argue with each other. Speak ill, murmur hushed, and slander each other. I remember there was one scene in particular where Juliee said something to him, then left and receiving a @page from someone asking if I was okay??? - Umm yeah. I was. Anton wasn't but I was totally chill as we players discussed them meeting up and how the scene might go if people left them unchecked. Some of the most fun had in this game was that plot and thankful for that friendship with her player.

                    Anyway enough of that and moving onto probably my biggest obstacle and it is a hard one to describe. Fortunately someone discussed this on the usual hellfire that is MU Soapbox and it connected so strongly:

                    Originally posted by cupcake
                    I am super fucking frustrated with myself; I want to enjoy the roleplaying I'm involved in, and yet can't shake the pervasive notion by and large that I am a tolerated presence rather than being someone others consider an enthusiastic addition people are eager to be involved in. It's happening more and more to me, it feels like.

                    If this was purely emotional I think I could logic myself into ignoring it, but my brain wants to keep pointing at this or that circumstance which are in and of themselves, likely perfectly reasonable occurrences. But what's whispering in the hindbrain is that this is evidence of others disliking you, of others putting up with you, they don't really want you here.

                    I keep trying to remind myself that what I feel is real, but it also isn't true. I just really need to stick it until the proof of it not being true outweighs the anxiety.

                    Advice, gently offered, is welcome. PM preferred.

                    Edited to add: I am NOT blaming anyone for this, or insinuating that this is anyone's problem but mine regarding my own perception. For clarity.
                    Originally posted by kestral
                    I think there's worth in questioning if the game environment you're in is really actually good for your mental health or if you're just treading on a wheel thinking that a change will come. Sometimes change does come along but often, due to sunk cost principal, FOMO, and the general idea that everyone else seems to be without struggle... we keep scratching away at something that isn't meant to be.

                    Sometimes a game environment is clearly a toxic dump on fire which is easier in a way because it's a much easier sign to get out. Sometimes it's just not a match and it's no one's fault.
                    Originally posted by Apos
                    It is very simple to get people to want to spend time with you, by being extremely generous with your time, and making it be about them, and helping them have fun. It's just the simplest things can be very difficult to do, and require an intense commitment of time and energy.

                    Think of this way- some of the most utterly toxic, worst examples in the hobby are very popular because they realize this, at a fundamental level, that if they just keep giving and giving their time often to an unhealthy extent, people will appreciate that, and they can use that to then justify the unbelievably shitty things they do afterwards. Someone donating their time and energy is appreciated to such an extent that a large amount of people are willing to overlook truly atrocious behavior.
                    I read that, and thought. Huh. That might be why I don't invent my own stories anymore.

                    Anyway that ended up much longer than I thought it would be...

                    TL;DR: Nah. You read the whole thing.
                    "In our age there is no such thing as ‘keeping out of politics.’ All issues are political issues, and politics itself is a mass of lies, evasions, folly, hatred and schizophrenia."

                    "Although many of us consider ourselves forward-thinkers, we still cling tenaciously to the old values of the system."

                    "Between two groups of people who want to make inconsistent kinds of worlds, I see no remedy but force"

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                    • #11
                      Taite - my response wasn't toward you exclusively. I'm grateful for players who are eager to come up with ideas, just more realistic after years of playing about what will be allowed within the theme, what can reasonably be gotten IG, etc. There are still things I get told no about myself, so it's a continual learning process

                      Anton - "I think there's worth in questioning if the game environment you're in is really actually good for your mental health or if you're just treading on a wheel thinking that a change will come."

                      I agree with this and struggle with it myself sometimes. I'm sure anyone who has invested a lot of time into this game feels that way at some point. The 'stories' being told aren't always worth the aggravation and drama they impose upon a person, not to mention the time sink. My greatest pet peeve is investing my time in the game to work towards a goal, sacrificing time with my children and husband, for people to simply not bother showing up, or for someone to randomly be thrown in the pot for something when they've not invested anywhere near the amount of time or IG roleplay you would expect was necessary. It makes one wonder what they're doing it for. -- I guess I still hold out hope for eventual consistency when it comes to how things are done/decided/etc, and I do believe with CM going to the SH the opportunity for 'change' is more present than it has ever been.
                      Acolyte Natura of the Faith
                      Courtier
                      Head of Household for her Ladyship Sinvy
                      Leader of the Stylists
                      Mistress of Entertainments
                      Patron of the Duelists
                      Royal Artist
                      Ranger Recruit
                      Squire to Dame Galatea

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Josie_Brennan View Post
                        I do believe with CM going to the SH the opportunity for 'change' is more present than it has ever been.
                        Opportunity, yes.

                        Possibly... ehh.

                        This is way off topic, but it seems the change is - keep doing as we are doing right now.
                        "In our age there is no such thing as ‘keeping out of politics.’ All issues are political issues, and politics itself is a mass of lies, evasions, folly, hatred and schizophrenia."

                        "Although many of us consider ourselves forward-thinkers, we still cling tenaciously to the old values of the system."

                        "Between two groups of people who want to make inconsistent kinds of worlds, I see no remedy but force"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This is a situation you see mirrored in D&D a lot, honestly.

                          Roleplay isn't an inherent skill set. Or at least, the complexities of it aren't inherent. It isn't that hard to pretend to be someone else, but there's more to being someone else than just not being yourself. There are things you have to learn to be a 'good' D&D player, and sometimes it can be hard to learn on your own, or if nobody is actively teaching you.

                          For those who play D&D regularly, you all likely know that one person who more often than not gets roped into being the DM. That person is me in my circle of nerds. And that has taught me a lot about the relationship between IC and OOC information, and also about how to get more out of your RP that just... being not-you while things happen around not-you.

                          For your average D&D player, you make a character having some small notion of what the campaign is going to be like, you write a paragraph or two backstory explaining how your character got to where they are, and then you take over from there. The campaign happens, and your character might have a typical, slight defining feature like being cynical or being naive or being really big, or being apathetic. The campaign's story happens around you and you walk through it in a largely straight line, or you rail against it in all directions for... reasons. Maybe just for the reason of being contrary, so you stand out, or because it's funny. But the thing is, those characters are forgettable. They are limited in the opportunities for interaction with the story, so the story just happens around them, or to them, but they're not really an organic part of it. They're just sort of the wall that the wave of the story crashes against.

                          Now, I get it. Those characters are easy to make. I knew a guy who as prep for a new campaign would make 10+ character 'concepts' and decide which one he wanted to play more right before we started. A lot of the time he would also change his mind after a session or two. They were safe, too. Because there's not a lot of emotional investment in them, they require less energy to play, you can't be too sensitive about things that happen to them, and if they forever-die then it's not a big deal. But again, these characters are forgettable. Now, D&D has a lot of systems in it to establish 'rules' so that everyone has a fair chance of playing with one another. It has more rules than CM does, to my mind. But it is still, to me, an RP-based game. To truly roleplay, there has to be story. And for a story to be good, it can't be forgettable. It doesn't have to linger in the mind forever because memory is a fickle thing, but we all know the difference between a forgettable movie and and one that we talk about after we've seen it for at least a couple of days. Conveniently or inconveniently - it's hard to say, sometimes - a story is carried along by the characters involved in it. The story is only as good as the people telling it. So when you make those forgettable characters that the story just happens to, at best the story moves on to someone else. More often, the story suffers. At worst, the story completely dies.

                          So what's my point? Anyone who knows Halvard knows he rambles, and that's unfortunately a side-effect of being played by me. A character of mine that doesn't ramble exists only because I am specifically stopping myself from rambling at any given time.

                          Well, the point I started with (and then convoluted a bit) is that there are rules to roleplaying well. Guidelines may be a better word.

                          As touched on before, one of those rules involves the relationship we have with OOC information. Metagaming sucks. It sucks for the storyteller, it sucks for the story as an entity, and it sucks for the people enjoying a story. Understandably, to avoid this, some people shut down all channels of OOC communication. Is it effective? Probably, technically. But it makes you inaccessible to others, and others might want to involve your character in something they're planning. If you're inaccessible, so is your character, so some degree. Maybe you don't want any foreknowledge of story. That I understand. It's like spoilers. I hate spoilers. I watch the first trailer to a movie I want to see, and then I never watch anything else about it, I avoid all speculative talk about it, all reviews, so I can just go and see it and make up my own mind and enjoy it without the colour of other peoples' perceptions. Because of this, I struggled with being a DM at first. Being a DM is living one big spoiler all the time. You feel like you know the story, and anyone you involve will also have to know the story, at which point... well, where's the point in telling it we already know what it is? So maybe you involve people who you didn't tell the plan of the story to. But because they don't know what's supposed to happen, they do it differently that you wanted them to and the outcome of your story is just... gone, or no longer realistic. Or they don't understand it and then stagnate it. Or, worse, they don't like it and decide to ignore it.

                          There is no single person or thing to blame in this situation. But there are things you can do to avoid it happening.

                          1. When making your story, you must be willing to let it change the instant it begins. This means that you cannot plan only for a specific outcome because you won't get it 99% of the time. But not getting the outcome you intended is not always a bad thing. Sometimes you end up with someone you didn't know you wanted in the first place. You absolutely have to be willing to trust others with your story, and accept their interpretation of it. Now, this touches on the 'how do I trust someone I don't know with x hours/days/months/years of my life's work?'

                          This leads to...

                          2. When making a character, don't just tell the story of how they got to where they are. Leave something unfinished. Leave room for something from the past to affect their present. You have the ultimate leeway with this, given your character wakes with amnesia in a vacuum. It gives you the opportunity not to have to prove anything that ever happened to them, you don't have to insist the implications of their past are reflected upon the game world, and you don't have to decide immediately what that past is. You get so much room and so much opportunity to give your character little story hooks that there just isn't any reason why you wouldn't. Give your character something to care about that isn't directly part of the Castle. A regret, a feeling, a family they'll never see, a family they see but don't recognize (if you can co-ordinate with another player). Make them flawed. Prone to anger, prone to arrogance, prone to indecision, to cruelty, to deception, to self-preservation, and give them a reason for that flaw. Flaws will disappear if there isn't a reason for their existence. Having an established character doesn't mean you can't give them flaws, because you have all that potential backstory in which to create your reasons, and a character with reasons and flaws will inevitably find themselves in a situation they don't know how to handle, and that's when we not only surprise ourselves, we surprise the people who create the stories around the character. This is where characters start to become memorable, not only because they stand out for their flaws, but because their flaws and their reasons offer unique, active opportunities in which to interact with a story. These types of characters invariably help storytellers who are open to their story changing, because they offer variables. Variables from involved characters are the direct counter to storytellers wondering why they should bother telling a story they already know the outcome of. They change the story simply by being more than one-dimensional.
                          Ser Halvard
                          Bodyservant to the Lord Chancellor

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                          • #14
                            [had to split my post into two because I exceeded the character limit for a single post by about 2K. Never done that before. The waffling, it rises.]

                            And this all leads to consequences, which is a topic that has been covered in exhaustive detail over the lifetime of these forums. So many people have gone over it in-depth over the years, people more articulate and focused than I am. But it always boils down to two opposing ideas:

                            You have to accept failure as part of your story and treat the consequences as just another part of the story.

                            Versus...

                            But the consequences are boring/limit my RP/invalidate the time and effort I've put into the game and nobody else is suffering them.

                            It's still the trickiest conundrum of co-operative storytelling. It always will be, I think. I'm not sure there is a correct answer, or choice. It's probably always going to be subjective. But the most interesting characters and stories have always, always, involved someone who is willing to bear the cost of the consequences, ICly and OOCly. I think some of the problem is that 'treat your failures as RP' sounds like it should stop the failures being unpleasant. It doesn't. What it does do is help you to endure it in a way that makes your character memorable. And like we've established, a memorable character, just one, makes a story more memorable. And a memorable story begets memorable stories and memorable characters. And at the end of all that, you have a great game.

                            Maybe this is where staff can make a profound difference. Sure we might need staff to throw an emote into a room now and then to help facilitate a story, or we might need an item made, or something of that sort, or a VP brought on at a specific time. The burdens of staff are many. But when it comes to consequences, acknowledging, promoting, generally praising the 'successful' characters in a story (for lack of a better term) isn't that difficult. We can pat our own backs very hard is one important person pats it for us just once and then leaves. I think instead the efforts of staff in a story should be more focused on the people who failed. It doesn't need to be a participation trophy, or an actual reward for failing (though sometimes it wouldn't be inappropriate, depending on the story), but rather as someone, some way, to show the 'defeated' characters that there is more for them than having to RP their failure for as long as people hold grudges.

                            An example of this situation has come up OOCly over the last couple of days. I'm not going to pretend to be intimately involved in the situation to a point where I can judge what should or should not happen, but it works as an example on which to hypothesize.

                            So, the character of Kona is physically wrecked. Maybe she brought it on herself with her actions. Maybe her actions were forced on her by the story. We probably all have an opinion on it. Those who survived the Hand of Five plot got our own RP out of it. Our characters had success, they lived with stories to tell, or valuable knowledge to feel slightly smug about having (come on, we all feel a little smug when our character knows something most don't). We get to speculate about what's next, because it isn't properly over until a certain thing happens and now we have characters who are actively involved in pursuing that end. Then there's Kona, who not only died but got all the negatives of being a sorcerer, physically, without getting any of the benefits (that we're aware of). She is unique in her suffering of consequences regarding that plot. Now, like I said I'm not going to pretend I know what the right course of action is. But I think staff have a duty of care toward her and her alone, because she is the only one really suffering. Should her consequences just be undone? No, I don't think so. It kind of invalidates the choices she made to get where she is, and cheapens the experience and the story. But she has to believe there is opportunity for something, anything, to come from the consequences, and she shouldn't have to be the only person trying to find that something.

                            So, TL;DR, our storytelling has to be open to change, and our characters have to be complex enough to evolve the story, not just endure it. When someone pays the consequences, there needs to be support available.

                            Hopefully this frankly huge rant has some positive effect. Maybe I just like to waffle.
                            Ser Halvard
                            Bodyservant to the Lord Chancellor

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                            • #15
                              I'm not reading/responding to all of this, but...

                              Re Halvard's post on Kona:

                              This is being looked into IC by Blodwen to try and fix some of the negative side effects and hopefully provide some story.

                              Hopefully no one has been saying otherwise OOC, since a handful of characters know IC it's being looked into.

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