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..:: Farah's Stuff ::..

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  • ..:: Farah's Stuff ::..



    Hello, welcome to Farah's Stuff. I'm Farah, a tailor for Leather Workers.

    I am pretty new to advertising my craft but I've been working on tailoring for months.
    I figured now that I am nearing master, I should put myself out there and attempt to sell things.

    I have limited access to dyes since all my money goes into my guild, but this will soon change.

  • #2
    This is a blank page. I may use this in the future, please do not write on it.

    ~ Farah

    Comment


    • #3

      ((Click name for Image))

      Back Cloak: It is a cloak that, attached to the shoulders, falls down to the floor behind the wearer. The woman's version trails the floor in a graceful curve, while the men's cloak barely grazes the floor.
      Bellcloak: It is a cloak buttoned down the front with bulky sleeves in folds of cloth. Overall, this cloak resembles a bell.
      Brat Drape: A basic, but versatile, upper body draping. Often highly decorated, it can be worn several ways including belted around the waist, and pinned over one shoulder.
      Cape: This is a sleeveless outer garment which is designed to fasten at the throat and fall down the back of the wearer. Typically, luxurious materials are used to manufacture a cape, which is intended to be more fashionable than functional as a general rule. It falls only partially down the back, and drapes elegantly over the shoulders.
      Chasuble Cape: This is a generic, circular cape with an aperture for the head.
      Evening Cape: This is a sleeveless outer garment which is designed to fasten at the throat and fall down the back of the wearer. Worn as a formal garment, this particular cape is meant to be made from fine materials only, sometimes being constructed from lacy knit patterns or crochets, and occasionally beaded or laced with gems. It falls only partially down the back, and drapes elegantly over the shoulder.
      Capelet: This is a miniature cape designed to be worn during warm weather. Barely covering the shoulders in the front, the top rests just under the nape of the wearer in the back to fashionably frame the neckline.
      Hooded Cloak: A full, floor-length cloak bearing a deep, concealing hood. It can be tightened at the neck via drawstrings or secured with a clasp.
      Collared Cape: Typically worn as courtly attire, this particular cape has a large over-turned collar ending at the hips, and features side openings for free movement of the arms.
      Gollar Cape: A round or square shoulder covering used to keep the neck and chest area warm.
      Hooded Lacerna Cloak: A large, semi-circular cloak draped around the shoulder, down the back, and typically secured with a piece of jewelry. It bears a hood and serves as protection against the elements.
      Lacerna Cloak: A large, semi-circular cloak draped around the shoulder, down the back and typically secured with a piece of jewelry. It serves as protection against the elements.
      Manteau Cloak: A type of loose, ankle-length cloak that is worn over indoor clothing to protect the wearer from the elements, or it may form part of a fashionable outfit or uniform. It features a mantle spanning the width of the shoulders and ending at the neck with a collar and drawstring ties.
      Mantle: It is a cloak fashioned from a rectangular piece of cloth and is sleeveless. It reaches to the feet and wraps loosely around the body, shielding the wearer from the elements.
      Sagum Mantle: A square, rectangular mantle draped over armor and held at the shoulder with a clasp or thorn.

      Ankle-Length Jacket: This garment extends almost to the floor and possesses long sleeves which reach to the wearers wrists. It is intended to protect the wearer from the elements, and is held shut by laces which run from the waist to the neck.
      Buttoned Long Coat: A long-sleeved garment worn about the body, it covers the chest, torso and thighs when closed. Starting from the collar and ending at the waist are a series of double-row buttons with a button at each wrist to make allowance for turn-back cuffs.
      Courtepy: A close fitting tunic or surcoat ending above the knee with long, hanging sleeves, wide-slit from shoulder to wrist. It is fitted with a standing collar.
      Dagged Doublet: A fashionable doublet featuring dagged, diagonal cuts and decorative metallic trim. A row of twelve buttons close the garment while laces are available to tighten the sleeves.
      Doublet: A long-sleeved garment worn about the body, it covers the chest and torso when closed.
      Long Jacket: A long-sleeved garment worn about the body, it covers the chest, torso and thighs when closed.
      Peascod Doublet: A traditional doublet bearing the characteristic shape of a pot belly. It features a stiff, tight underlining, buckram to make the protruding shape, and padding to hold it out. A peplum decorates the lower portion of the garment with small wings surrounding the armholes and hiding the points that are used to tie on the sleeves.
      Pourpoint: A body-skimming under-doublet which closes in the front via tied points. The sleeves and collar have been ommited while eyelets have been worked in the hem to support chausses or hose.
      Quilted Jerkin: A tailored, sleeveless jacket that fits close to the torso with a short collar. The entire garment has been textured to give a quilted appearance.
      Short Coat: Similar to the pirate jacket, this particular waist-length garment features a double row of buttons, a pair of short, back-turned cuffs, and fashionable collar.
      Short-sleeved Doublet: A short-sleeved garment worn about the body which covers the chest and torso when closed.
      Sleeveless Doublet: A sleeveless garment worn about the body which covers the chest and torso when closed.

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      • #4

        ((Click name for Image))

        Back Cloak: It is a cloak that, attached to the shoulders, falls down to the floor behind the wearer. The woman's version trails the floor in a graceful curve, while the men's cloak barely grazes the floor.
        Bellcloak: It is a cloak buttoned down the front with bulky sleeves in folds of cloth. Overall, this cloak resembles a bell.
        Brat Drape: A basic, but versatile, upper body draping. Often highly decorated, it can be worn several ways including belted around the waist, and pinned over one shoulder.
        Cape: This is a sleeveless outer garment which is designed to fasten at the throat and fall down the back of the wearer. Typically, luxurious materials are used to manufacture a cape, which is intended to be more fashionable than functional as a general rule. It falls only partially down the back, and drapes elegantly over the shoulders.
        Chasuble Cape: This is a generic, circular cape with an aperture for the head.
        Evening Cape: This is a sleeveless outer garment which is designed to fasten at the throat and fall down the back of the wearer. Worn as a formal garment, this particular cape is meant to be made from fine materials only, sometimes being constructed from lacy knit patterns or crochets, and occasionally beaded or laced with gems. It falls only partially down the back, and drapes elegantly over the shoulder.
        Capelet: This is a miniature cape designed to be worn during warm weather. Barely covering the shoulders in the front, the top rests just under the nape of the wearer in the back to fashionably frame the neckline.
        Hooded Cloak: A full, floor-length cloak bearing a deep, concealing hood. It can be tightened at the neck via drawstrings or secured with a clasp.
        Collared Cape: Typically worn as courtly attire, this particular cape has a large over-turned collar ending at the hips, and features side openings for free movement of the arms.
        Gollar Cape: A round or square shoulder covering used to keep the neck and chest area warm.
        Hooded Lacerna Cloak: A large, semi-circular cloak draped around the shoulder, down the back, and typically secured with a piece of jewelry. It bears a hood and serves as protection against the elements.
        Lacerna Cloak: A large, semi-circular cloak draped around the shoulder, down the back and typically secured with a piece of jewelry. It serves as protection against the elements.
        Manteau Cloak: A type of loose, ankle-length cloak that is worn over indoor clothing to protect the wearer from the elements, or it may form part of a fashionable outfit or uniform. It features a mantle spanning the width of the shoulders and ending at the neck with a collar and drawstring ties.
        Mantle: It is a cloak fashioned from a rectangular piece of cloth and is sleeveless. It reaches to the feet and wraps loosely around the body, shielding the wearer from the elements.
        Sagum Mantle: A square, rectangular mantle draped over armor and held at the shoulder with a clasp or thorn.

        Ankle-Length Jacket: This garment extends almost to the floor and possesses long sleeves which reach to the wearers wrists. It is intended to protect the wearer from the elements, and is held shut by laces which run from the waist to the neck.
        Buttoned Long Coat: A long-sleeved garment worn about the body, it covers the chest, torso and thighs when closed. Starting from the collar and ending at the waist are a series of double-row buttons with a button at each wrist to make allowance for turn-back cuffs.
        Courtepy: A close fitting tunic or surcoat ending above the knee with long, hanging sleeves, wide-slit from shoulder to wrist. It is fitted with a standing collar.
        Dagged Doublet: A fashionable doublet featuring dagged, diagonal cuts and decorative metallic trim. A row of twelve buttons close the garment while laces are available to tighten the sleeves.
        Doublet: A long-sleeved garment worn about the body, it covers the chest and torso when closed.
        Long Jacket: A long-sleeved garment worn about the body, it covers the chest, torso and thighs when closed.
        Padded Doublet: This is a slightly padded pourpoint overshirt meant to be fastened down the front to cover the chest and torso.
        Peascod Doublet: A traditional doublet bearing the characteristic shape of a pot belly. It features a stiff, tight underlining, buckram to make the protruding shape, and padding to hold it out. A peplum decorates the lower portion of the garment with small wings surrounding the armholes and hiding the points that are used to tie on the sleeves.
        Pourpoint: A body-skimming under-doublet which closes in the front via tied points. The sleeves and collar have been ommited while eyelets have been worked in the hem to support chausses or hose.
        Quilted Jerkin: A tailored, sleeveless jacket that fits close to the torso with a short collar. The entire garment has been textured to give a quilted appearance.
        Short Coat: Similar to the pirate jacket, this particular waist-length garment features a double row of buttons, a pair of short, back-turned cuffs, and fashionable collar.
        Short-sleeved Doublet: A short-sleeved garment worn about the body which covers the chest and torso when closed.
        Sleeveless Doublet: A sleeveless garment worn about the body which covers the chest and torso when closed.
        Last edited by FarahHeart; 11-17-2017, 08:25 AM.

        Comment


        • #5

          ((Click name for Image))

          Arming Cotte: An upper torso covering featuring 8 arming points with leather rectangles at the shoulder, upper arm and leg to use for pointing your armour. It is designed to keep your arm and leg harness hanging exactly where it belongs, while distributing its weight across your entire torso.
          Bag-Sleeved Cotte: While being similar to the tunic and surcoat, this shirt is fitted closer to the body with bag sleeves ending in snug cuffs at the wrist.
          Cavalier Shirt: A male garment featuring full sleeves, gathered cuffs, and a stiffened collar with a lace front closure.
          Fold-Neck Shirt: This is a cowl-front shirt which pulls on over the head before the front is folded down across the throat and under the collar. This style of shirt protects the wearer's chest and throat from drafts and any over-collars from becoming dirty easily.
          Gambeson: A thick padded garment designed to be worn under a chainmail shirt to reduce the risk of injury. Adjustable laces extend from the neck to the upper chest.
          Gypsy Shirt: A men's straight cut shirt with full sleeves and a v-neck turned back collar.
          Half-Cape Frilled Shirt: A long-sleeved male shirt decorated with a half-cape accessory that covers the front and back shoulders. Subtle frills decorate the upper chest and cuffs of the garment.
          Half-Shirt: A male upper body garment that wraps about the torso and drapes over one shoulder to leave half the chest exposed.
          Infantry Gambeson: A heavy-duty gambeson worn by knights and men-at-arms alike. The quilted body makes it a great addition over a shirt of chainmail if one is available. It features lacing up the left side along the torso and neck to lend a fitted look, and a high collar for extra protection.
          Padded Shirt: A lace-up gambeson which can be worn as a stand alone garment or as an undershirt with a jerkin. The long, fitted sleeves are decorated with a patterned thread design.
          Riveted Tunic: A generic tunic stylized with unfinished and fringed edges to give a rougher look to the wearer.
          Rucked Shirt: A stylish shirt with a standing rucked collar front generally closed via decorative buttons. It features a three-tiered cascading center front ruffle and sheered long sleeves ending in buttoned cuffs.
          Ruffled Shirt: This is a garment comes with convenient ties at the wrists. Each generous sleeve ends in a fashionable ruffle.
          Short-Sleeved Shirt: This is a garment for the upper part of the body, with a collar, short sleeves, and a buttoned front.
          Sleeveless Shirt: This is a sleeveless garment for the upper part of the body, with a collar and a front opening.
          Sleeveless Tunic: This loose-fitting sleeveless tunic extends to the thighs and worn by both men and women. It features a simple collar and can be dressed up with belts or worn as is for a more casual appearance.
          Slit-Neck Shirt: This is a simple, loose-fitting shirt with tubular sleeves, underarm gussets, and a boat neckline.
          Tie-Neck Shirt: This is a simple, loose-fitting shirt with tubular sleeves and underarm gussets. The banded collar extends into front ties.
          Tie-Neck Tunic: A simple, loose-fitting shirt with tubular sleeves and underarm gussets. The banded collar extends into front ties.
          Tunic: A loose-fitting long-sleeved tunic, extending to the thighs and worn by both men and women.
          Two-Toned Shirt: A garment for the upper part of the body, with a collar and front-opening. It sports a pair of baggy, two-toned sleeves that tie snugly at the wrists.
          Undertunic: A loose fitting, long sleeved undertunic, shorter than an over tunic, and to be worn between the body and more precious garments.
          Vest: This is a sleeveless garment generally worn by men under a coat or jacket and on top of a shirt.
          Last edited by FarahHeart; 11-17-2017, 08:23 AM.

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          • #6

            ((Click name for Image))

            Boot Hose: Worn with breeches or trousers, these are masculine footless stockings which are traditionally turned over boot cuffs to expose a fashionable lace or trim edge.
            Braccae: Pants made with a drawstring that tend to reach from just above the knee at the shortest, to the ankles at the longest, with length generally increasing in tribes and clans living further north.
            Breeches: These are trousers ending just above the knee, often worn by riders, clergy, and affluent middle class.
            Chaps: Heavy trousers without a seat, worn over ordinary trousers to protect the wearer's legs.
            Chausses: These are pants designed to cover the legs, which extend downward to rest atop the feet. There are laces at the top which can be tied onto braies or laced to a supportive codpiece.
            Doublet Hose: Close-fitting leggings reaching up to the hips and usually fastened to a doublet.
            Ensemble Pants: Ankle-length, paneled legwear featuring open slashes and a button-up front.
            Harem Pants: Baggy pants, tied at the ankles.
            Hose: The most traditional style of male hose extending downward from the waist and encapsulating each of the feet. They are most commonly worn with dress shoes or other varieties of footwear outside boots.
            Jodhpurs: Wide-hipped riding pants of heavy cloth, fitting tightly from knee to ankle.
            Pantaloons: These are baggy trousers extending from waist to ankle.
            Pluderhose: These are knee-length breeches which are baggy and paned. They are traditionally worn by men.
            Shorts: These are trousers that end at or above the knee, generally worn by men.
            Slops: Flamboyant knee-length shorts which are slashed vertically from the knee to reveal contrasting fabric underneath. There are laces at the groin which can be tied closed or laced to a supportive codpiece.
            Split-Hose: These are a transitional style of hose made of separate legs which have been bias-cut and are open from front to back through the crotch. This garment features a seam running the entire length of the wearer's rear, is lined to mid-thigh, and has a full foot. Thread eyelets located on the upper edge point the hose to a doublet or pourpoint. This style affords much more coverage of the hip and buttocks than chausses, and is often seen on soldiers and working people.
            Stretch Pants: Skin-tight legwear featuring leather straps which buckle around the calves.
            Swordsman Pants: Legwear featuring drawstrings at the ankles, as well as right above the knees which can be tightened to lend a puffy and swashbuckling appearance to the wearer, or loosened for a more casual and comfortable look.
            Tights: A snug stretchable garment covering the body from the waist down.
            Trews: A pair of lightweight trews complete with a drawstring waist and a bottom tie. The tie is flexible and can be drawn at the ankles or bloused up and tied at the knee.
            Trousers: Loose-fitting legwear with a gusseted crotch for freedom of movement. They tie with a drawstring waist for comfort.
            Two-Toned Pants: These baggy pants extend from the waist to the ankles and can be adjusted with the use of drawstrings along the entire length. The material itself is comprised of two different shades of the same colour.
            Underdrawers: Beginning at the waist and extending downward to the knee, these male undergarments serve as a separate lining to breeches and other pants, aiding in preservation of over garments and adding an additional layer of warmth.
            Last edited by FarahHeart; 11-17-2017, 08:12 AM.

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            • #7

              ((Click name for Image))

              Ankle-high Boots: These boots reach just to to the ankle and tie securely via lacing on the side. They feature padded soles for added comfort.
              Bucket Boots: These boots reach just to mid-leg before folding down over the knee into an elaborate 11 inch flared bell cuff. The interior features a padded sole for comfort.
              Calf-high Boots: These boots reach just to to the calf and are accented by a series of fashionable buttons and laces. The interior is complimented with a plush lining and padded sole, ensuring these boots are comfortable, all day pieces of apparel.
              Dress Shoes: This fancy footwear completely conceals the wearer's feet and extends to just above the ankle before tying or buckling securely into place. Traditionally, these are highly polished or decorated and worn to formal events.
              Heeled Boots: These 2 inch heeled boots reach just to to the knee and boast top-folded cuffs. The interior features a padded sole for comfort.
              Infantry Boots: These tough, heavy boots rise just to the calf and feature wooden toggles which can be tied to the side for a secure fit. They have been enhanced with comfort soles and a thin heel to provide good traction.
              Knee-high Boots: These boots reach just to the knee and close via three side strap enclosures with ties. The interior features a padded sole for comfort.
              Strapped Boots: Footwear reaching just to the knees which is held in place by a myriad of primitive strings and straps wrapped about the circumference.
              Tall Boots: These boots reach just to the thigh and feature a back slit panel that allows them to be cuffed down. They have a 1 inch heel and are padded for comfort.
              Toggle Boots: These tough boots rise to just below the calves and are excellent for peasant work as well as for wearing under armours. They slip on and then close via a pair of toggles.
              Work Boots: Durable footwear that has a protective reinforcement in the toe, usually combined with a sole plate, which protects the foot from falling objects and punctures from below. They extend just to the calf before tying securely.

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