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Tailor Patterns

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  • Tailor Patterns

    At the request of the populace, here are the garments I'm able to create as a tailor.

    (OOC: This whole area is plastered in titled drawings depicting male and unisex garments)

    Miscellaneous

    Braies: A masculine lightweight undergarment complete with a drawstring waist and a bottom tie. The tie is flexible and can be drawn below the knee or bloused up and tied on the upper thigh.

    Codpiece: . A supportive pouch of fabric worn over the groin by men.
    Inconspicuous laces at the sides hold the garment in place.

    Loincloth: A garment designed for wrapping around the waist to cover the genitals. Usually a simple piece of cloth which is left to dangle downwards, it is a basic, primitive garment.

    Pajamas: It's a garment usually worn by men and conservatively made, designed mostly for comfort when sleeping.

    Pouch: It is wrapped around the waist with a string.

    Robe: The loose-fitting robe is reaching to the ground and completely covers the wearer. This garment is normally a mark of a humble demeanor and great accomplishments. It is usually earned via religious, magical or other secretive means. It comes complete with a long tailed hood and a corded waist. The hood hangs loose against the upper back.
    Last edited by Adriana; 10-15-2013, 11:18 AM.

  • #2
    Cloaks

    Back cloak: It is a cloak that, attached to the shoulders, falls down to the floor behind the wearer. The woman's version trails the floor in a graceful curve, while the men's cloak barely grazes the floor.

    Bellcloak: It is a cloak buttoned down the front with bulky sleeves in folds of cloth. Overall, this cloak resembles a bell.

    Brat drape: A basic, but versatile, upper body draping. Often highly decorated, it can be worn several ways including belted around the waist, and pinned over one shoulder.

    Cape: This is a sleeveless outer garment which is designed to fasten at the throat and fall down the back of the wearer. Typically, luxurious materials are used to manufacture a cape, which is intended to be more fashionable than functional as a general rule. It falls only partially down the back, and drapes elegantly over the shoulders.

    Chasuble cape: This is a generic, circular cape with an aperture for the head.

    Evening cape: This is a sleeveless outer garment which is designed to fasten at the throat and fall down the back of the wearer. Worn as a formal garment, this particular cape is meant to be made from fine materials only, sometimes being constructed from lacy knit patterns or crochets, and occasionally beaded or laced with gems. It falls only partially down the back, and drapes elegantly over the shoulder.

    Sword cape: This is a half circle cape extending to mid-thigh. It is traditionally worn on one side and secured by a simple, yet elegant tie.

    Capelet: This is a miniature cape designed to be worn during warm weather. Barely covering the shoulders in the front, the top rests just under the nape of the wearer in the back to fashionably frame the neckline.

    Hooded cloak: A full, floor-length cloak bearing a deep, concealing hood. It can be tightened at the neck via drawstrings or secured with a clasp.

    Collared cape: Typically worn as courtly attire, this particular cape has a large over-turned collar ending at the hips, and features side openings for free movement of the arms.

    Gollar cape
    : A round or square shoulder covering used to keep the neck and chest area warm.

    Hooded lacerna cloak: A large, semi-circular cloak draped around the shoulder, down the back, and typically secured with a piece of jewelry. It bears a hood and serves as protection against the elements.

    Lacerna cloak: A large, semi-circular cloak draped around the shoulder, down the back and typically secured with a piece of jewelry. It serves as protection against the elements.

    Manteau cloak: A type of loose, ankle-length cloak that is worn over indoor clothing to protect the wearer from the elements, or it may form part of a fashionable outfit or uniform. It features a mantle spanning the width of the shoulders and ending at the neck with a collar and drawstring ties.

    Mantle: It is a cloak fashioned from a rectangular piece of cloth and is sleeveless. It reaches to the feet and wraps loosely around the body, shielding the wearer from the elements.

    Sagum mantle: A square, rectangular mantle draped over armor and held at the shoulder with a clasp or thorn.

    Tebenna: A long, robe-like cloak that extends down to the ankles. It drapes over the left shoulder and then wraps around the torso under the right arm, where it is secured in place.

    Thigh-length cloak: Round in shape, this cloak reaches the thigh and fastens diagonally on the right shoulder with 6 buttons to reveal the garments beneath.

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    • #3
      Jackets

      Ankle-length jacket: This garment extends almost to the floor and possesses long sleeves which reach to the wearers wrists. It is intended to protect the wearer from the elements, and is held shut by laces which run from the waist to the neck.

      Buttoned long coat: A long-sleeved garment worn about the body, it covers the chest, torso and thighs when closed. Starting from the collar and ending at the waist are a series of double-row buttons with a button at each wrist to make allowance for turn-back cuffs.

      Cotehardie: Similar to the doublet, this is a four-piece garment tailored to fit close to the body with snug sleeves ending at the wrists. It is fastened along the forearms and down the front with a row of buttons.

      Courtepy: A close fitting tunic or surcoat ending above the knee with long, hanging sleeves, wide-slit from shoulder to wrist. It is fitted with a standing collar.

      Dagged coat: This is a coat featuring a simple, semi-fitted body, mid-length skirts, a small standing collar, and bag sleeves. Elaborate dagging has been created along the bottom edge. This garment is traditionally worn over a doublet and hose.

      Dagged doublet: A fashionable doublet featuring dagged, diagonal cuts and decorative metallic trim. A row of twelve buttons close the garment while laces are available to tighten the sleeves.

      Doublet: A long-sleeved garment worn about the body, it covers the chest and torso when closed.

      Great coat: A large overcoat typically made of heavy materials, designed for protection against the weather. Its collar and cuffs can be turned out to protect the face and hands from cold and rain, and the short cape around the shoulders provides extra warmth.

      Long jacket: A long-sleeved garment worn about the body, it covers the chest, torso and thighs when closed.

      Padded doublet: This is a slightly padded pourpoint overshirt meant to be fastened down the front to cover the chest and torso.

      Peascod doublet: A traditional doublet bearing the characteristic shape of a pot belly. It features a stiff, tight underlining, buckram to make the protruding shape, and padding to hold it out. A peplum decorates the lower portion of the garment with small wings surrounding the armholes and hiding the points that are used to tie on the sleeves.

      Pleated coat: This is a short jacket with pleats radiating from the shoulder and running to the hem with the waist creating a fashionable X shape. This garment closes with hidden hooks in the center front.

      Pourpoint: A body-skimming under-doublet which closes in the front via tied points. The sleeves and collar have been ommited while eyelets have been worked in the hem to support chausses or hose.

      Quilted jerkin: A tailored, sleeveless jacket that fits close to the torso with a short collar. The entire garment has been textured to give a quilted appearance.

      Short buckled jacket: A short female jacket ending just below the breasts that features a deep hood and a series of three buckles that close securely upon the chest. Each of the long sleeves is laced up via a myriad of eyelets and colored string.

      Short coat: Similar to the pirate jacket, this particular waist-length garment features a double row of buttons, a pair of short, back-turned cuffs, and fashionable collar.

      Short-sleeved doublet: A short-sleeved garment worn about the body which covers the chest and torso when closed.

      Silhouette jerkin
      : A sleeveless jacket that has been punched for decoration and improved fit. It buttons at the waist and remains open at the torso to reflect the fashionable narrow-waisted silhouette.

      Slashed sleeved doublet: A hip-length doublet with long, slashed sleeves which reveal the sleeves of the garment beneath.

      Sleeveless doublet: A sleeveless garment worn about the body which covers the chest and torso when closed.

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      • #4
        Pants

        Boot hose: Worn with breeches or trousers, these are masculine footless stockings which are traditionally turned over boot cuffs to expose a fashionable lace or trim edge.

        Braccae: Pants made with a drawstring that tend to reach from just above the knee at the shortest, to the ankles at the longest, with length generally increasing in tribes and clans living further north.

        Breeches: These are trousers ending just above the knee, often worn by riders, clergy, and affluent middle class.

        Chaps: Heavy trousers without a seat, worn over ordinary trousers to protect the wearer's legs.

        Chausses: These are pants designed to cover the legs, which extend downward to rest atop the feet. There are laces at the top which can be tied onto braies or laced to a supportive codpiece.

        Doublet hose: Close-fitting leggings reaching up to the hips and usually fastened to a doublet.

        Ensemble pants: Ankle-length, paneled legwear featuring open slashes and a button-up front.

        Flared pants: These are body-hugging leg coverings that cling from the hips down to the thighs and then flare outward into belled bottoms from the calves down.

        Harem pants: Baggy pants, tied at the ankles.

        Jodhpurs: Wide-hipped riding pants of heavy cloth, fitting tightly from knee to ankle.

        Pantaloons: These are baggy trousers extending from waist to ankle.

        Pants: An article of clothing covering the body from the waist down, with separate coverings for each leg that extend to the ankles. They are usually closed and fastened by either buttons or a laces, though straps with buckles or brooches are also commonplace.

        Pleated pants: Pleated, skirtlike trousers that fit snugly at the waist before radiating broadly toward the ankles of the wearer. They are typically worn by fighters to disguise leg movement.

        Pluderhose: These are knee-length breeches which are baggy and paned. They are traditionally worn by men.

        Puffed pants: Extending from waist to ankles, these pants are puffy except for the ties that hold them snug above the knees.

        Ruffled pants: Three cascading ruffles grace the lower legs of these pants, with a close-lying fit through the hip and thigh regions. They come complete with a wide waistband for comfort.

        Shorts: These are trousers that end at or above the knee, generally worn by men.

        Slops: Flamboyant knee-length shorts which are slashed vertically from the knee to reveal contrasting fabric underneath. There are laces at the groin which can be tied closed or laced to a supportive codpiece.

        Split-hose: These are a transitional style of hose made of separate legs which have been bias-cut and are open from front to back through the crotch. This garment features a seam running the entire length of the wearer's rear, is lined to mid-thigh, and has a full foot. Thread eyelets located on the upper edge point the hose to a doublet or pourpoint. This style affords much more coverage of the hip and buttocks than chausses, and is often seen on soldiers and working people.

        Stretch pants: Skin-tight legwear featuring leather straps which buckle around the calves.

        Swordsman pants: Legwear featuring drawstrings at the ankles, as well as right above the knees which can be tightened to lend a puffy and swashbuckling appearance to the wearer, or loosened for a more casual and comfortable look.

        Tights: A snug stretchable garment covering the body from the waist down.

        Trews: A pair of lightweight trews complete with a drawstring waist and a bottom tie. The tie is flexible and can be drawn at the ankles or bloused up and tied at the knee.

        Trousers: Loose-fitting legwear with a gusseted crotch for freedom of movement. They tie with a drawstring waist for comfort.

        Two-toned pants: These baggy pants extend from the waist to the ankles and can be adjusted with the use of drawstrings along the entire length. The material itself is comprised of two different shades of the same colour.

        Underdrawers: Beginning at the waist and extending downward to the knee, these male undergarments serve as a separate lining to breeches and other pants, aiding in preservation of over garments and adding an additional layer of warmth.

        Waterfall pants: Legwear featuring a drawstring waist that has been designed to portray an upside-down waterfall effect. The width of the material increases from the bottom toward the waist in a cascading fashion, creating an archetypal look on the wearer.

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        • #5
          Shirts

          Arming cotte: An upper torso covering featuring 8 arming points with leather rectangles at the shoulder, upper arm and leg to use for pointing your armour. It is designed to keep your arm and leg harness hanging exactly where it belongs, while distributing its weight across your entire torso.

          Bag-sleeved cotte: While being similar to the tunic and surcoat, this shirt is fitted closer to the body with bag sleeves ending in snug cuffs at the wrist.

          Cavalier shirt: A male garment featuring full sleeves, gathered cuffs, and a stiffened collar with a lace front closure.

          Fold-neck shirt: This is a cowl-front shirt which pulls on over the head before the front is folded down across the throat and under the collar. This style of shirt protects the wearer's chest and throat from drafts and any over-collars from becoming dirty easily.

          Frilled shirt: A male shirt enriched with a single frill and front-lying eyelets. Loose-fit sleeves extend down to the wrists where a small frill creates an elegant finish.

          Gambeson: A thick padded garment designed to be worn under a chainmail shirt to reduce the risk of injury. Adjustable laces extend from the neck to the upper chest.

          Gypsy shirt: A men's straight cut shirt with full sleeves and a v-neck turned back collar.

          Half-cape frilled shirt: A long-sleeved male shirt decorated with a half-cape accessory that covers the front and back shoulders. Subtle frills decorate the upper chest and cuffs of the garment.

          Half-shirt: A male upper body garment that wraps about the torso and drapes over one shoulder to leave half the chest exposed.

          Hooded overtunic: A sleeveless, layered tunic with edging around the shoulders and a matching hood secured by hidden wires to shroud the wearer's hair and head.

          Infantry gambeson: A heavy-duty gambeson worn by knights and men-at-arms alike. The quilted body makes it a great addition over a shirt of chainmail if one is available. It features lacing up the left side along the torso and neck to lend a fitted look, and a high collar for extra protection.

          Padded shirt: A lace-up gambeson which can be worn as a stand alone garment or as an undershirt with a jerkin. The long, fitted sleeves are decorated with a patterned thread design.

          Riveted tunic: A generic tunic stylized with unfinished and fringed edges to give a rougher look to the wearer.

          Ruffled shirt: This is a garment comes with convenient ties at the wrists. Each generous sleeve ends in a fashionable ruffle.

          Shirt: This is a garment for the upper part of the body, with a collar, sleeves, and a front opening.

          Short-sleeved shirt: This is a garment for the upper part of the body, with a collar, short sleeves, and a buttoned front.

          Sleeveless shirt: This is a sleeveless garment for the upper part of the body, with a collar and a front opening.

          Sleeveless tunic: This loose-fitting sleeveless tunic extends to the thighs and worn by both men and women. It features a simple collar and can be dressed up with belts or worn as is for a more casual appearance.

          Slit-neck shirt: This is a simple, loose-fitting shirt with tubular sleeves, underarm gussets, and a boat neckline.

          Tie-neck shirt: This is a simple, loose-fitting shirt with tubular sleeves and underarm gussets. The banded collar extends into front ties.

          Tie-neck tunic: A simple, loose-fitting shirt with tubular sleeves and underarm gussets. The banded collar extends into front ties.

          Tunic: A loose-fitting long-sleeved tunic, extending to the thighs and worn by both men and women.

          Two-toned shirt: A garment for the upper part of the body, with a collar and front-opening. It sports a pair of baggy, two-toned sleeves that tie snugly at the wrists.

          Undertunic: A loose fitting, long sleeved undertunic, shorter than an over tunic, and to be worn between the body and more precious garments.
          Vest: This is a sleeveless garment generally worn by men under a coat or jacket and on top of a shirt.

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          • #6
            Socks

            Kilt hose: These are custom knit top hose with a cabled cuff and reinforced feet. They are designed to be worn with kilts.

            Leggings: A leg covering usually extending from the ankle to the knee and often made of material such as leather or canvas, worn especially by soldiers and workers.

            Legwraps: These are woven strips of cloth designed to be wrapped around the lower leg. They are traditionally secured by tucking in the loose ends, but garters with tassels or tags can also be used.

            Socks: Tubes of fabric that cover the feet up to the ankle. Special socks can be crafted for those with bigger feet or hooves.

            Spatterdashes: Generally coupled with leggings, these cover the leg from the mid-shin to the top of the foot, and are typically worn by the sporting gentleman, laboring man, and the military.

            Toe socks: Each sock is effectively a tube of fabric that covers the foot up to the ankle, and each toe is encased in it's own private tube for warmth and privacy. Special socks can be crafted for those with bigger feet or hooves.

            Toeless socks: Each sock is effectively a tube of fabric that covers the foot up to the ankle, whilst leaving the toes exposed. Special socks can be crafted for those with bigger feet or hooves.

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            • #7
              *pushed to the front by an energetic mink*

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