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Macro's for Zealotry

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  • Macro's for Zealotry

    Anyone have a link to using Macro's on Zealotry or could provide a quick overview? I'm lost in the sauce and someone just informed me of the benefits of using the client over the server side stuff.
    Nothing much to say.

  • #2
    Install/open Zealotry, in the top bar click Options > Preferences > Macros. In that text field is where you'll create your macros. It's done like this:

    Code:
    CONFIG WRITE
    MACRO ADD r retreat
    MACRO ADD g guard %1
    MACRO ADD ug unguard %1
    MACRO ADD o corpse
    MACRO ADD f from
    MACRO ADD dd discard
    MACRO ADD ee empty
    MACRO ADD tt @mtarg
    MACRO STORE
    CONFIG WRITE
    - MACRO ADD is the actual client command to add the macro
    - the letter(s) afterwards is what you'll enter to get the desired command
    - after the letters comes the command you're macroing
    - if applicable, %1 is a variable

    When finished, click Submit Changes then reload the client, you should see scroll at the top prior to your login stating the macros have loaded successfully. You cannot change MACROs on the fly like you can with @macros, the steps above must be followed and the client reloaded every time.

    Code:
    [MACRO <r> created as: retreat]
    [MACRO <g> created as: guard %1]
    [MACRO <ug> created as: unguard %1]
    [MACRO <o> created as: corpse]
    [MACRO <f> created as: from]
    [MACRO <dd> created as: discard]
    [MACRO <ee> created as: empty]
    [MACRO <tt> created as: @mtarg]
    [MACRO: Macro support can be found in the Preferences popup.]
    [MACRO: Finished loading macros]
    Zealotry version 0.7.12.4 loading...
    
    ===============================================================================
    
    Welcome to The Eternal City
    (c)1996-2013 Skotos Tech
    
    --------------------------------
    
    Welcome to The Eternal City!
    
    If you are having any password or other connection troubles
    please send mail to ce@skotos.net
    
    ===============================================================================
    Login:
    With my macros set up as above, I can simply type the following to guard Japes, loot a pouch from the second corpse, discard it and then unguard Japes:

    g japes
    get pou f 2 o
    dd pou
    ug japes

    MACROs are useful for things that will be used often on many different targets or in many different contexts so you aren't forced to type out full commands or switch your @mtarg every time. They are not very useful for simply shortening static commands like attacks, switching languages, inventory, etc.

    The only thing to be mindful of is not MACROing things that will be used by themselves such as directions (n, e, s, w) or that might overwrite something else that already has a command. MACROs take precedence over @macros and built-in system commands, always.

    Navigating system menus can still be done with a letter MACROed, just use the capital character instead. If you had MACROed 'b' to something, going to the bank and checking your [B]alance could still be done by typing 'B' rather than 'b'.

    One trick with MACROing 'r' to 'retreat' is you can combine it with @macros to have just 'r' do both your fallback and retreat direction with one command: @macro 'r' to 'retreat' and 'retreat' to 'fall back' - you will use fall back when typing just 'r' or retreat in a direction by typing 'r e'.

    Hope this helped.

    Comment


    • #3
      This is very helpful, thanks!

      One thing that is escaping me is how to target specific areas of an @mtarg I've designated. For example:

      In the server side macros, I designate jh : jab <target> high

      With Zealotry, I used your tt = @mtarg. I tt gladiator. Then, using the same structure as above, I created jh = jab <target> high in Zealotry. That doesn't work.
      Nothing much to say.

      Comment


      • #4
        MACROS (Zealotry side) do not interface directly with @macros (server side) and the @mtarg system hinges on @macros. When you MACRO "jh" to "jab <target> high" what the client sees that as is literally "jab <target> high" with no regards to the @mtarg established as a <target> prior. In order to use the @mtarg system, your attacks must be @macros.

        What you COULD do is:

        MACRO ADD jh jab %1 high

        Which would result in you typing "jh ryth" to jab Rythgen high but I would honestly recommend just using @macros for your attacks and switching targets with tt or whatever you've MACROed @mtarg to. The reason using tt = @mtarg is nice is because you can just type "tt ryth" to save yourself the keystrokes of typing "@mtarg ryth" which is not something you can do on the fly with an @macro. All MACROs do is expand into something else while allowing additional context to be used in conjunction with them, eg. "tt" into "@mtarg" to "tt ryth". @macros are locked into whatever the @macro was set as, no variables or surrounding context.

        As I mentioned earlier, things that are going to remain constant like attacks, commands, etc are better off being @macros. Things you will type often with different syntax are great as MACROs. Emotes are something done very well with MACROs, actually; if your character has a tic they do all the time (and you have to type out all the time), MACROing the emote can save you a lot of keystrokes. Example:

        MACRO ADD look1 :looks <%1> up and down before nodding approvingly.

        look1 knel

        Rythgen looks Kneller up and down before nodding approvingly.

        This will function correctly for the recipient and those around just as if you had manually typed it out as ":looks <knel> up and down etc" in regards to names and pronouns. Two notes: This does NOT work with possessive emotes. If you use the above syntax and try to use "knel+p" as your variable, it'll come out looking like this:

        Rythgen looks Kneller up and down before nodding approvingly.+p

        I haven't figured out a way to get this to work yet but I honestly haven't put that much effort into it either.

        Second note, be careful you don't macro any emotes like that to actual commands. "look1" works fine but if you macro it to "look", it will overwrite the actual "look" command - MACROs are not intelligent and will indiscriminately expand to whatever you make them, period.

        Some things could be done with either @macros or MACROs depending on your preference, such as getting and wielding your weapon. If you @macro "gg = get retalq gladius" and "wg = wield retalq gladius" then you know gg will always get your retalq gladius. You could then use gg2/wg2 for your bronze, gg3/wg3 for your tin, etc. OR you could MACRO "gg = get" and "wg = wield" and instead just type "gg ret, wg ret" or "gg bro, wg bro". Personal preference really but it's another way to utilize MACROs.

        Comment


        • #5
          I just have a macro that auto mtargs, I found that to be the easiest. Especially because I hate overused targeted emotes most of the time.


          @macro
          a
          Treehouse
          target brigand|man|archer

          You type in: Treehouse
          Your new macro target is brigand|man|archer

          That was the simplest system for me, hasn't failed me yet. I have expanded it in a few places for my characters that are more mundane.

          For example: Iridine
          Your new macro target is thug|brute|alley dog|gladiator|sailor

          ***
          When bandit hunting with Hurrok I simply put in: Bandit Hunting
          Your new macro target is man|woman|*specific plate*|cleburnus|specific hood


          If you mess around with it, it makes things super easy.

          Comment


          • #6
            I do the same thing actually for all the common hunting grounds.

            Code:
             sands                          @mtarg sailor|marine|seafarer
             treehouse                      @mtarg man|brigand|archer
             island                         @mtarg gull|snapper|pup|turtle|crab
            
             etc etc
            The MACRO tt = @mtarg is mostly for changing targets on the fly like in a PvP situation or a specific brigand when they're guarding each other, I can just type "tt 2 brig" instead of each attack being manually aimed at it. In the heat of the moment just typing "tt hurr" is a lot easier than "@mtarg hurr".

            While we're on the topic of useful @macros too, here are some of mine:

            Code:
             n                              go north
             e                              go east
             s                              go south
             w                              go west
             ne                             go northeast
             se                             go southeast
             sw                             go southwest
             nw                             go northwest
             u                              go up
             d                              go down
             $                              wealth
             c                              condition
             ih                             inhand
             ll                             lighting
             pp                             practice
             ppp                            passive
            @macro'ing the directions to "go <direction>" saves you any headaches of specific portals that require a 'go', such as some doors, arches, ladders, etc. $ = wealth just makes sense to me and everything else is fairly self-explanatory. Other ones I use are spc = speak common, spa = speak altene, etc; os = open my sack, cs = close my sack, op = open my pouch, etc; z = get my key, zz = unlock door with key, zzz = open door, x = close door, xx = lock door with key, xxx = put key in my pouch.

            Comment


            • #7
              Are there any other benefits to MACROs, such as server receive/response time?

              Comment

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